Leftist newspaper vandal caught on camera

 
Welcome, Hugh Hewitt readers! Make yourselves at home.

Take a good, close look at this champion of intellectual diversity:

Busted!

She’s cleaning out a newspaper rack full of the latest issue of The Sentinel and dumping the papers in the trash. The Sentinel is Ohio State University’s student conservative newspaper, and its fine writing obviously continues to anger campus leftists in Columbus … because it has the perplexing quirk of disappearing from the racks before leftists in training students get a chance to read the latest commentary from the right. Happily, this Thought Policeperson got caught on camera by the paper’s staff.
Here’s the kicker: according to The Sentinel, she’s a Postdoctoral Researcher who works at OSU’s Environmental Molecular Science Institute.
I’m sure there’ll be more to follow on Dr. Stickyfingers at the newspaper’s blog, The Open End.

NB: I’m also pleased to mention that The Open End is a member (along with Brain Shavings, Wizblog, Eric Hogue, and Hugh Hewitt) of a mighty blog alliance here in Ohio called The Buckeye Bloggers.

A solid, well-written Ohio blog

If you haven’t done so already, drop by the Columbus-based blog The Open End, where you’ll find a team of good writers working in undeserved obscurity. They’re not in lockstep with each other, so you’ll sometimes find a sharp yet courteous debate going on. However, liberal nuttiness gets a cheerful skewering every day, especially if it involves political correctness at The Ohio State University (a little inside Buckeye joke, there).

Religion and politics

Yesterday I pointed out the correlation between deeply-held Christian belief, knowledge of current events, and antipathy to Islam. Today, Power Line notes a similar connection between religious belief and voting patterns:

This year’s election made clear what political leaders have known for some time — religious belief and degree of religious commitment are closely associated with how people vote. Thus, the extent to which people hold, and are serious about, religious beliefs has a direct bearing on who will hold political power and what our policies will be across the spectrum of key foreign policy and domestic issues. Put another way, the fact that so many Americans believe in God and take religious teachings so seriously is a major reason why our politics and policies are not like those of Europe, where religion has been marginalized.

This is another “duh” moment for most everybody from the center to the right in American politics, but I’m betting that the guys at Power Line felt obligated to point out what ought to be obvious, since otherwise intelligent folks like Jeff Jarvis and Jesse Taylor still just don’t seem to get it.
Hugh Hewitt tackles Jarvis’ essay on the supposedly exaggerated battles over Christmas in America:

It is too easy to say “everything is fine,” and “chill.” The place of faith in America is a crucial topic that deserves every bit of attention it receives, even when a particular battle seems overblown when measured against the persecution of the house church in China.
Every time an elitist condemns a person of faith as a “theocrat,” or a scientist rejects an argument against embryonic stem cell research as a “fundamentalists’ position,” the effort to expel faith from the public square advances, and not via debate, but via the sneer. Jeff Jarvis may not care a bit because such steps don’t result in bloodshed or any sort of violence. But most public policy disputes don’t, and the absence of physical injury doesn’t make them any less worthy of debate or attention. Jarvis’ jeremiad against focus on conflicts between the sectarian and the secular is itself an attempt to demote issues of faith in the culture to second-class conflicts, beneath the attention of “serious” thinkers — a back lot drama played out by hayseeds and snake handlers. How convenient, and how wrong.

Read the whole thing.
For more examples of the War on Christmas, keep checking in with Hugh Hewitt, Michelle Malkin, and David Limbaugh.

Fishing for liberals

In an article just published by The Sentinel (a conservative publication at Ohio State University), conservative student columnist Stephen Dronen relates his encounter with volunteers conducting a Democrat voter registration drive … and his resulting experiment in liberal-baiting.

I took to the streets to see if my appearance had any bearing on their action. First dressing as I normally do; dressed in a pair of khaki chinos, a light blue Oxford, and a pair of brown Doc Martin�s, I entered the hostile territory. Not to my surprise, I walked right past the activists amidst a haze of “Stop the Bush Imperialists”, “No Blood for Oil”, and “Not My President”! It was as if they didn�t even see me.

The first phase of my testing was complete; they had failed to approach me during three opportunities. Enter phase two: undercover. Garbed in a borrowed Pearl Jam t-shirt, a set of torn jeans, a pair of Birkenstocks, some thick rimmed “emo” glasses, and the quintessential hemp jewelry, I returned to the scene of the crime. It is amazing how different the experience was, as I was double teamed from the second I entered the intersection where two hours earlier the same people failed to realize I was even in their presence.

It’s an entertaining read, so help yourself.
Hat tip: The Open End

Diplomad’s advice to Condi Rice

The Diplomad offers advice to the next Secretary of State:

We won’t deal with policy issues here. … Our concern is the Department as an institution and what can be done to rescue it from itself and make it an effective agency, and by that we mean effective at representing and promoting America’s interests abroad. We all know that the new Secretary is not going to spend time fixing this broken institution. … We hope that … at a minimum a fierce, Neanderthal-like brute will be appointed Undersecretary for Management. It is to this person that we direct ourselves with hope in our hearts and pleading in our eyes.

Slash and burn. … It can take a year or more to assign someone to a posting. Absurd. Reduce the size of the personnel (HR) operation. Put an end to the little empires that exist in HR, empires established by bureaucrats who “homestead” themselves in the HR system, spending years there accumulating power, establishing networks to reward themselves and friends and to punish “enemies.” It is tempting to rely on these persons’ “expertise,” but resist it; rotate them out. Make them stand in a visa line in Mexico City. Get them out of Washington on a regular basis. It’s the Foreign Service. They don’t want to go? They can go work for the DMV.

Until you reform the assignment process, have the Secretary not assume that a person who is, for example, working on Arab-Israeli affairs, actually knows something about Arab-Israeli affairs or that what he knows is actually right or worth knowing. That person could have gotten the job thanks to some complex deal having nothing to do with substance.
Take a hard look at the size and number of embassies abroad. Do we really need an embassy in every African and European country? Do we need them so big?

I wish Condi (and Porter Goss at the CIA) success at smashing obstructionist bureaucrats. Remind them who’s the boss.
Hat tip: Chrenkoff

Purple America

Robert J. Vanderbei at Princeton takes the red state / blue state meme to a much more informative level, using shades of purple on a county-by-county map to show the results of this election.

Purple America

On another map, he even added false mountains to designate areas with higher population.

Election2004textured_small.gif

What a great way to clearly convey a mountain of complex information. Edwin Tufte would be proud.

UPDATE: An apparent Tufte fan found a map of Purple America with highly-populated areas artificially expanded. Groovy.
UPDATE 2: More maps.
UPDATE 3: Another one using elevation for population differences between counties (I’m guessing it’s showing population density, not absolute population), and no shades of purple.