Tagged: mexico

Good fences make good neighbors

What might the implications be for the United States if Mexico collapses? Before you answer, consider that a national border is nothing but a theoretical concept if it’s not controlled, and if one or both nations refuse to preserve a distinct national culture.

If America continues to ignore its borders and downplay its uniquely capitalist, Judeo-Christian, constitutionalist culture, the only thing separating people of common ethnic descent on both sides of the US/Mexican border will be the Americans’ willingness to resist a de facto invasion by Mexicans hoping for material security.

If you’re unsure what history can teach you about the pull of ethnic solidarity, fire up a search engine and plug in terms like “Balkan powder keg,” “Kurdistan,” “The Troubles in Northern Ireland,” or “Rwandan Genocide.”

Build the wall first

Cox & Forkum cartoon

I’ve been keeping quiet on the illegal immigration debate, because I know I’m likely to get hot under the collar and write something I’ll regret later. Both of my parents are naturalized citizens, as are my uncles and aunts, and as were my grandparents. As a child of legal immigrants, I’m quite anti-illegal-alien in my outlook. That’s why I’ve been biting my tongue. However, I’m also a veteran, and national security is my number one priority. Since the Senate has crafted a disastrous “compromise” on illegal immigration today, there’s one thing I simply must put on the record now: America needs to build a wall along the entire Mexican border, and we need to do it as soon as possible.
I approach the problem as a retired Coast Guardsman. The massive influx of illegals is like seawater flooding a ship through a hole in the hull. The top priority is to stop the flooding. Pumping the water out can wait. Drying out the wet spaces belowdecks can wait. Upgrading to a thicker hull can wait. Plug the hole first. Deal with the results afterward.
This is a national security issue, not a race issue or an economic issue. This wouldn’t be a “Berlin Wall”; our wall would keep enemies out, not oppressed citizens in. Our border with Mexico is our giant back door, and it’s hanging wide open. Locking the front door and putting bars on the windows makes no sense if we leave the back door open. Islamists can slip into our Southwest as easily as anybody else can, and they aren’t looking for jobs. No “virtual wall” will do. We need a long, high physical barrier like the one Israel built. Israel’s wall drastically reduced the number of terrorist attacks from the West Bank and Gaza, and ours would make it much harder for terrorists to perpetrate a new Beslan massacre in Arizona.
I understand that making our border into a barrier will upset the Mexican government, but I care more about our national security than I care about keeping the Mexicans happy. I understand that illegal immigrants will try to find other ways into the country. Fine; we’ll plug those gaps when we find them. We might want to build another wall along some or all of our border with Canada, too, and I’m willing to start near Detroit. But our top priority must be to build a long, high wall between us and Mexico. Every other immigration issue can wait.

Cox & Forkum cartoon

There, I said it.
Update: Hugh Hewitt knows what’s most important, too.

Mexico looking for friends in Iran

Mexico’s making diplomatic overtures to the mullahs of Iran, which has me thinking.

Mexico is ready for expanding ties with Iran on all areas, notably in economy and trade, the deputy of Mexico’s foreign ministry for economic affairs, Irma Avriana said on Friday.
Speaking to the grand seminar on Irano-Mexican economic relations, Avriana said Iran was an important power in the Middle East and “we believe expanding ties with Iran will be in the interests of every country including Mexcio.”

Every country, Ms. Avriana?
I’ll be keeping an eye out for a subdued retraction from the quoted deputy or her superiors (they’ll want to be low-key about it for obvious reasons). If Mexico backtracks, it’ll likely be due to behind-the-scenes pressure from the Bush Administration. If there’s no retraction, and no objection from Bush, then consider the following.
According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, in 2003 we saw our southern border crossed by 266,469 loaded rail containers, 2,600,019 loaded trucks, 88,068,391 personal vehicles, 319,087 buses, and 48,663,773 pedestrians. Keep in mind that those statistics reflect the crossings we know about; there were lots more that we never detected.
Now picture a nuclear Iran that’s cozy with Mexico, with thousands of Iranian nationals busily working and living there. How difficult do you suppose it might be for our understaffed Border Patrol to detect a suitcase nuke being smuggled over the border?
Hat tip: Michelle Malkin