Mark Steyn takes on Islamist kooks

Go read Mark Steyn’s latest column on Afghanistan citizen Abdul Rahman’s death sentence* for converting from Islam to Christianity. A few gems:

As always, we come back to the words of Osama bin Laden: ”When people see a strong horse and a weak horse, by nature they will like the strong horse.” That’s really the only issue: the Islamists know our side has tanks and planes, but they have will and faith, and they reckon in a long struggle that’s the better bet. Most prominent Western leaders sound way too eager to climb into the weak-horse suit and audition to play the rear end.

I can understand why the president and the secretary of state would rather deal with this through back-channels, private assurances from their Afghan counterparts, etc. But the public rhetoric is critical, too. At some point we have to face down a culture in which not only the mob in the street but the highest judges and academics talk like crazies.

They sure do talk like crazies, but they certainly are not crazy. And there are a lot of them.
* : Rahman has already been “freed” … sort of.

It’s time for cyberwar

I’ve read through the National Security Strategy for 2006 released last Friday by the White House, and overall it’s a hardheaded and realistic approach to dealing with current and future enemies. However, I think they missed something: aggressively conducting cyber warfare against jihadi web sites and bulletin boards.
For years now it’s been common knowledge (even in the mainstream media) that the Islamists use web sites and online bulletin boards to coordinate their efforts and recruit new adherents to their cause. They also use encrypted e-mail to transmit commands, coordinate their finances and handle logistics. The jihadis expertly manipulate the media into broadcasting their calls to jihad, their videotaped bombings, and worst of all the beheading of hostages.
Encouraging words, but where’s the follow-up?
Continuing a theme he’s advanced since 2002, Defense Secretary Rumsfeld noted last month:

We are fighting a battle where the survival of our free way of life is at stake. And the center of gravity of that struggle is not just on the battlefield. It is a test of wills and it will be won or lost with our public and the publics of free nations across the globe. We will need to do all we can to attract supporters to our efforts, to correct the lies being told which so damage our country, and shatter the appeal of the enemy. [emphasis added]

My first reaction to the speech was, “Great! Let’s start taking down their websites and bulletin boards and e-mail servers.” Based on Secretary Rumsfeld’s comments, I figured that there’d be something along those lines in today’s new National Security Strategy … but I don’t see it in there.
4/4/2007 Update: Is the behemoth finally waking up? Maybe.

Join the Toy Jihad!

Special Ops CodyMatt Heidt is right. The jihadis in Iraq are getting desperate for any kind of success. But now they’ve really begun to circle the drain; they’ve begun making hostage videos of toy soldiers.
razanne.jpgDo the Jihadi Joe action figures who took John Adam “Special Ops Cody” hostage get 72 Barbie dolls if they die for Allah? Silly me, I meant 72 Razanne dolls (see photo to right), not the blonde-haired Western she-devils.
Of course, you can just take the mercenary’s shortcut … for $644.40 you can buy 72 Razannes and have Paradise on Earth (after about 7 business days for shipping and handling). But the company doesn’t ship to Belarus, Indonesia, Liberia, Pakistan, Nigeria, or Romania … so if you’re plotting Toy Jihad© there, you’ll just have to blow your plastic self up at a Barbie Fashion Show Mall.
Speaking of ridiculous jihadis (yes, yes, I know it’s redundant), do you remember Evil Bert appearing with Osama?

Evil Bert

Click on the unaltered (I swear!) picture below for all the background info.

Your Sesame Streets will run with the blood of infidels!

Too funny. I sense a photoshopping contest approaching …

UPDATE: Save Elmo!
UPDATE 2: When will it end? Oh, the humanity …
UPDATE 3: At least we caught Osama, so we’ve got that goin’ for us. Which is nice.
UPDATE 4: The blogosphere gutted this farce in short order. I love this hobby.
UPDATE 5: The geniuses at Democratic Underground took the bait … hook, line, and sinker.

Muslim death cultists aren’t subhuman

Again with the beheadings.

Today the Islamists have sawn off the head of Jack Hensley of Marietta, Georgia. Yesterday they sawed off the head of Eugene Armstrong of Hillsdale, Michigan.
I’m not surprised. Hopefully we’ll preserve our collective outrage over this, but I suspect this kind of thing’s already becoming blas&#233 in our jaded and media-saturated culture. Amid all the outrage expressed in the blogosphere, I’ve noticed a theme that needs correcting if we’re going to keep the right perspective. My blogging brethren often express their fury with epithets like “animals” and “subhuman scum” when they refer to the evil men who saw off captives’ heads in the name of a “merciful Allah.” It’s understandable to use those labels, but it’s not right because it lets these evil muslims off the hook for their actions.

We feel anger when we find out about these slaughters precisely because these evil men are more than just animals. They’re people, and that means they know better. When a cougar mauls a child, we hunt it down and kill it without much passion because it’s a dumb animal with no sense of morality. When men shoot fleeing children in the back or saw off the heads of helpless civilians, they earn our undying enmity because they know they’re committing evil.

For you left-leaning readers who feel uncomfortable with arguments based on right and wrong, think of this from a legal perspective. The Model Penal Code (which forms the basis for many states’ criminal codes) breaks down most crimes into four categories, asking whether the perpetrator committed the crime negligently, recklessly, knowingly, or purposefully. If a man fires a gun through a flimsy backstop in his backyard and the bullet accidentally kills his neighbor’s child, we’ll likely prosecute him for negligent homicide. But we hold him less culpable than the man who recklessly fires his gun into the air and kills the child playing in her yard two streets over. Worse still is the man who fires his rifle over a crowd of children, knowing he’ll probably kill someone. Worst of all is the man who fires a bullet into a fleeing child’s back for the purpose of killing her. Even our legal system emphasizes degrees of culpability and the importance of the perpetrator’s state of mind. It’s about as close to moral condemnation as our relativistic legal system ever gets.

I think the moral argument and our inherent sense of right and wrong provides the strongest foundation for holding these evil muslims responsible as people who consciously choose to do evil. You might find the legal approach more comfortable. Either way, intentions count for a lot.

From now on, I’m going to try extra hard not to understate the depths that these men have sunk to. I’m not going to call them animals or subhuman scum; these muslim death cultists are evil, and that’s why I’ll smile when they die violent and painful deaths.

I hope my fellow bloggers will do the same.

Roundup: Beslan school massacre

I have nothing new or unique to offer on the Beslan school massacre perpetrated by Islamists in Russia, other than my condolences and prayers (for comfort to the victims and neverending torment for the terrorists). Instead, I’ll just point you toward the best stuff I’ve found.
Michelle Malkin gathers key analyses of Russia’s 9/11.
So does Donald Sensing at One Hand Clapping.
Victor Davis Hanson thinks we should brace ourselves for terror attacks in the months ahead.
Dave Kopel has a suggestion on how to prevent a Beslan massacre here.
Mark Steyn calls it right: No other word for it but slaughter.
Wretchard at The Belmont Club wonders just what Vladimir Putin’s supposed to do, exactly?
Charles at Little Green Footballs points out a British muslim cleric who supports kidnapping women and children.
Getty Images has five pages of photographs. Blogs of War has a single photo of the aftermath.
The locals in Beslan caught one of the terrorists, lynched him, and tore him to pieces. And I wouldn’t be surprised if the Ossetians seek revenge on the Chechens sometime around November 7th (see the end of this story).

Internment camps revisited

Michelle Malkin has quietly written a book that re-examines the WWII internment of everyone of Japanese ancestry in certain West Coast areas, and looks at the implications for dealing with the Islamist threat today. She wrote “In Defense Of Internment” to ask the un-askable, and she will undoubtedly ignite a firestorm of controversy:

My aim is to kick off a vigorous national debate on what has been one of the most undebatable subjects in Amerian history and law: President Franklin Roosevelt’s homeland security policies that led to the evacuation and relocation of 112,000 ethnic Japanese on the West Coast, as well as the internment of tens of thousands of enemy aliens from Japan, Germany, Italy, and other Axis nations. I think it’s vitally important to get the history right because the WWII experience is often invoked by opponents of common-sense national security profiling and other necessary homeland security measures today.

I’m buying this book right now, because I’m still against internment but I’m willing to hear an argument for it.
You might not know this, but the U.S. Supreme Court decided a case on the internment camps in 1944. The Court refused to overturn the conviction of Toyosaburo Korematsu for violating the military’s exclusion order. What’s the point? Temporary non-race-based wartime internment has never been ruled unconstitutional. Here’s an excerpt:

To cast this case into outlines of racial prejudice, without reference to the real military dangers which were presented, merely confuses the issue. Korematsu was not excluded from the Military Area because of hostility to him or his race. He was excluded because we are at war with the Japanese Empire, because the properly constituted military authorities feared an invasion of our West Coast and felt constrained to take proper security measures, because they decided that the military urgency of the situation demanded that all citizens of Japanese ancestry be segregated from the West Coast temporarily, and finally, because Congress, reposing its confidence in this time of war in our military leaders — as inevitably it must — determined that they should have the power to do just this. There was evidence of disloyalty on the part of some, the military authorities considered that the need for action was great, and time was short. We cannot — by availing ourselves of the calm perspective of hindsight — now say that at that time these actions were unjustified.

It could happen again, especially if another big terror attack kills thousands of us. We interned people after Pearl Harbor, where 2,117 died. 9/11 cost us close to 3,000 … and we showed remarkable forebearance toward muslims. We’re more tolerant than we were in the 1940s, but our patience is not infinite. One more slaughter might be all it takes to trigger a new internment.
And before you accuse me of overstating the threat from muslims, consider the fact that there are potentially 270 million suicide bombers out there gunning for us.