Religion and politics

Yesterday I pointed out the correlation between deeply-held Christian belief, knowledge of current events, and antipathy to Islam. Today, Power Line notes a similar connection between religious belief and voting patterns:

This year’s election made clear what political leaders have known for some time — religious belief and degree of religious commitment are closely associated with how people vote. Thus, the extent to which people hold, and are serious about, religious beliefs has a direct bearing on who will hold political power and what our policies will be across the spectrum of key foreign policy and domestic issues. Put another way, the fact that so many Americans believe in God and take religious teachings so seriously is a major reason why our politics and policies are not like those of Europe, where religion has been marginalized.

This is another “duh” moment for most everybody from the center to the right in American politics, but I’m betting that the guys at Power Line felt obligated to point out what ought to be obvious, since otherwise intelligent folks like Jeff Jarvis and Jesse Taylor still just don’t seem to get it.
Hugh Hewitt tackles Jarvis’ essay on the supposedly exaggerated battles over Christmas in America:

It is too easy to say “everything is fine,” and “chill.” The place of faith in America is a crucial topic that deserves every bit of attention it receives, even when a particular battle seems overblown when measured against the persecution of the house church in China.
Every time an elitist condemns a person of faith as a “theocrat,” or a scientist rejects an argument against embryonic stem cell research as a “fundamentalists’ position,” the effort to expel faith from the public square advances, and not via debate, but via the sneer. Jeff Jarvis may not care a bit because such steps don’t result in bloodshed or any sort of violence. But most public policy disputes don’t, and the absence of physical injury doesn’t make them any less worthy of debate or attention. Jarvis’ jeremiad against focus on conflicts between the sectarian and the secular is itself an attempt to demote issues of faith in the culture to second-class conflicts, beneath the attention of “serious” thinkers — a back lot drama played out by hayseeds and snake handlers. How convenient, and how wrong.

Read the whole thing.
For more examples of the War on Christmas, keep checking in with Hugh Hewitt, Michelle Malkin, and David Limbaugh.

A high schooler with guts

Bryan Henderson of Princeton High School in Princeton, West Virginia got fed up with leftist teachers browbeating him, so he exercised his freedom of expression. Good thing he’s a tough kid, because the leftists were not amused with his politically incorrect views. Hat tip to the ever-clever (and doggone attractive) Whomping Willow on this story.
I wonder if Bryan’s inquisitors used the cut-n-paste leftist Screed-O-Matic demonstrated over at Protein Wisdom?

Blah blah right-wing Rumsfeld warmonger chickenhawk evil Bushies Wolfowitz and his neocon cabal for oiloiloiloiloiloil blah blah ignorant stupid bloodthirsty morons, the real axis of evil on a ranch in Crawford and blah blah blah no WMD he lied, Bushitler lied, people died died died tie-dyed peace peace peace down with the Zionists! peace peace Kyoto! they hate us they hate us they hate us and what can we do and root causes and root causes and blowback and Plame and Plame and Chalabi Plame Wilson blah blah blah unilateral multinational Halliburton Enronism crony capitalism and it’s all about oiloiloiloil blah blah blah

Hmmm … looks vaguely familiar

Forecast: partly cloudy with TRO flurries

Now that the Unborn Victims of Violence Act is in effect, watch the news over the next few days and you’ll likely see some pro-abortion activist request a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) against enforcing it.
The abortion industry plaintiffs (The National Abortion Federation, Planned Parenthood, and the ghoulish Dr. Leroy Carhart) got a TRO within hours of the enactment of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 (eventually they got three of ’em). They feared that public support of the ban was too strong to resist, and that posed a thorny problem. Solution? Shop around for a sympathetic federal judge with an itchy trigger finger, and bang! Keep those suction tubes a-hummin’ during the trials!
Now the abortion industry confronts a law that recognizes the personhood of the unborn, and they can read the writing on the wall. If they don’t gut this bill, the will of the people might actually be preserved … and that hurts the abortionists’ bottom line.
Watch this site and the plaintiffs’ Federal Abortion Ban Trials site for breaking news on the coming legal smackdown.